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Apple doesn’t want you mining bitcoin on your iPhone

You can no longer use your iPhone for mining bitcoins — or not through Apple’s official channels, at least.

Revised wording in the App Store review guidelines notes that Apple is banning apps which “run unrelated background processes, such as cryptocurrency mining.” In a dedicated cryptocurrency section, the company goes on to break down in more detail what is — and, crucially, is not — permissible.

“Apps may not mine for cryptocurrencies unless the processing is performed off device (e.g. cloud-based mining),” Apple notes. It also rules that, “Cryptocurrency apps may not offer currency for completing tasks, such as downloading other apps, encouraging other users to download, posting to social networks, etc.”

In terms of what Apple will allow, cryptocurrency wallet apps are still allowed, “provided they are offered by developers enrolled as an organization.”

Apple additionally wants to ensure the seriousness of Initial Coin Offerings, cryptocurrency futures trading, and other crypto-securities or quasi-securities trading. These, Apple writes, “must come from established banks, securities firms, futures commission merchants, or other approved financial institutions and must comply with all applicable law.”

Making its position clear

This doesn’t mark a major change as relates to Apple’s stance on cryptocurrencies. However, it does offer a bit more clarity. Back in 2014, Apple first ran into this issue as related to the popular bitcoin wallet app Blockchain. Apple booted the app out of the App Store, only to later restore it.

In the process, however, it had to spell out its approach to cryptocurrency for the first time. The initial guidelines noted that:

“Purchasing and Currencies 11.17 Apps may facilitate transmission of approved virtual currencies provided that they do so in compliance with all state and federal laws for the territories in which the app functions.”

Since then, cryptocurrencies have become more of a mainstream concern. The popularity of these apps, both from the perspective of consumers and developers, likely explains why Apple felt the need to clarify its position.

Source: Apple

Via: Apple Insider

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