New York Times

Trump, ZTE, Coltrane: Your Thursday Evening Briefing

Trump, ZTE, Coltrane: Your Thursday Evening Briefing

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Good evening. Here’s the latest.

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CreditTom Brenner/The New York Times

1. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan visited the White House for last-minute talks before President Trump meets Kim Jong-un on Tuesday.

Mr. Trump told reporters that he believed his tough tactics with Iran would carry over into successful negotiations with North Korea.

But first, Mr. Trump will travel to a sleepy village in Quebec for the Group of 7 meeting, with leaders of America’s closest allies.

Our Washington correspondent reports that Mr. Trump can expect a subzero reception for what some observers have begun calling the “G6+1.” That’s how isolated Mr. Trump has become, as a result of his unilateral trade and security actions.

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CreditTom Brenner/The New York Times

2. Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, promised that Republicans would draft legislation on immigration for a floor vote in the coming weeks.

That sets up a showdown on one of the thorniest political issues just as the midterm campaigns come into focus.

Any vote on a bill deemed “amnesty” by the party’s right flank could demoralize conservative voters in November. On the other hand, the failure of moderates to win support for the Dreamers could harm their chances in the districts most targeted by the Democrats.

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3. Separating parents and children is the Trump administration’s latest and most widely debated border enforcement policy.

José, a 5-year-old Honduran boy, was sent into foster care in Michigan and his father was arrested when they arrived at the border at El Paso.

He has been inconsolable, according to the woman caring for him now, and he carries around the pictures he drew of his family, above.

“He holds onto the two pictures for dear life,” she said through tears. “It’s heart-wrenching.”

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CreditCarlo Allegri/Reuters

4. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced a deal to lift the sanctions that had crippled the Chinese telecommunications giant ZTE, but said the U.S. retained the power to “shut them down again.”

ZTE had been a bargaining chip in U.S.-China trade talks, and it’s unclear how the deal will affect the conflict.

The Commerce Department said the company had agreed to pay a $ 1 billion fine for violating sanctions against North Korea and Iran, plus $ 400 million in escrow for possible future violations. ZTE will also allow the U.S. to embed a handpicked compliance team inside the company.

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CreditErin O. Smith/Chattanooga Times Free Press, via Associated Press

5. The federal government released grim new statistics on suicide: Rates rose in nearly every state from 1999 to 2016, often by as much as 30 percent. Above, backpacks displayed at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga to raise awareness about mental health issues.

The analysis found that slightly more than half of people who had committed suicide did not have any known mental health condition. But other problems — such as the loss of a relationship, financial setbacks, substance abuse and eviction — were common precursors. Firearms were by far the leading method.

If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). You can find a list of additional resources at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

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Creditvia Associated Press

6. In March, police officers in Sacramento shot and killed 22-year-old Stephon Clark, above, in his grandmother’s backyard. He was unarmed.

Using footage from police body cameras and aerial imagery, our visual investigations team created a moment-by-moment analysis of the shooting. (Warning: The video is graphic.)

The team members reveal a series of split-second decisions and errors over 23 seconds that ended in Mr. Clark’s death. (Here’s their written report.)

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CreditMuhammad Sadiq/EPA, via Shutterstock

7. President Ashraf Ghani of Afghanistan declared a unilateral cease-fire with the Taliban to begin next week, coinciding with the end of Ramadan, one of the holiest periods of the year in Islam.

The announcement is a strategic gamble designed to encourage the militants to conduct peace talks as the 17-year war grows deadlier. Above, a checkpoint in Kandahar.

The U.S. said its 14,000 troops in the country would honor Mr. Ghani’s call. There was no immediate response from the Taliban.

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CreditGregory Shamus/USA Today Sports, via Reuters

8. Despite the incredible efforts of LeBron James, the Cleveland Cavaliers are perched at the edge of defeat’s abyss, down three games to none. A possibly decisive Game 4 comes Friday.

James is 33 and will soon be a free agent. His fans — a generous portion of the population of Ohio — admire his sportsmanship, his talent, his philanthropy. But they have a sense of time fleeting, and many say they won’t blame him if he decides to leave.

“That man has earned the right to go and find a team worthy of his talent,” one resident said.

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CreditChuck Stewart, via Universal Music

9. You heard it here first: A lost John Coltrane recording from 1963 is about to be released for the first time. His quartet cut the album two years before the magnum opus, “A Love Supreme.”

The seven-song collection was recorded on a single day, then eventually stashed away and lost.

The family of Coltrane’s first wife, Juanita Naima Coltrane, recently discovered his personal copy and brought it to the attention of Impulse! Records. It will be released as “Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album,” on June 29.

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CreditRyan McGinley for The New York Times

10. Finally, we just put out a special issue of The New York Times Magazine, dedicated entirely to love in New York City over the course of a single day: Saturday, May 19, 2018.

As the editors write: “By choosing this theme and so tightly limiting the time frame, we hoped to convey the city’s magical density of intimacies, the way it juxtaposes (especially as the weather begins to warm) the private communion of one pair of lovers with the rollicking public energy of the bustling crowd — itself composed of numberless lovers communing privately amid the noise, all the center of their own universe.”

Have a great night.

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